Archive for the ‘Pulmonary Disease’ Category

Pulmonary Disease Associated with Pleural “Asbestos” Plaques: Conclusion

The higher incidence of smoking in patients with pleural plaques may also contribute to the higher incidence of pulmonary pathologic findings seen in those patients.
Each form of pulmonary fibrosis associated with pleural plaques can be expected to have a distinct appearance on HRCT; for example, peribronchiolar fibrosis should be manifested by increased radiodensity in the centrilobular areas, and scar-related emphysema should be seen by an area of high attenuation adjacent to an area of low attenuation. Read the rest of this entry »

Pulmonary Disease Associated with Pleural “Asbestos” Plaques: Discussion

Pulmonary Disease Associated with Pleural “Asbestos” Plaques: DiscussionEarly clinical studies on relatively small populations of patients concluded that CT was able to detect early fibrosis, even when the findings from conventional roentgenograms and pulmonary function tests were normal or inconclusive. The signs on CT purported to have an association with asbestosis included (1) thickening of septa, (2) parenchymal linear densities, (3) subpleural dependent density, (4) curvilinear subpleural lines, (5) honeycombing, and (6) pleural thickening. Read the rest of this entry »

Pulmonary Disease Associated with Pleural “Asbestos” Plaques: Histologic Features of the Lungs

Pleural Changes: Pleural thickening was more common in the cases with pleural plaques (35 patients) than in the controls (18 patients) and more severe (mean score of 0.74 vs 0.32; p<0.005).
Asbestos Bodies: Asbestos bodies were identified in routine histologic sections in eight of the cases with pleural plaques. In six of these cases, peribronchiolar fibrosis was also present (Fig 4). By definition, these six cases fulfill criteria for the diagnosis of asbestosis. The other pulmonary pathologic findings present in these six cases of asbestosis included pleural thickening (four cases), large scar (three cases), alveolar fibrosis (two cases), and one case each of interstitial fibrosis and scar-associated emphysema. Read the rest of this entry »

Pulmonary Disease Associated with Pleural “Asbestos” Plaques: Results

Pulmonary Disease Associated with Pleural “Asbestos” Plaques: ResultsHistologic Features of the Lungs
Fibrosis: Peribronchiolar fibrosis was identified in 49 (53 percent) of the 93 patients with pleural plaques and in 36 (39 percent) of the 93 control patients (Table 2). The mean peribronchiolar fibrosis product in the group with pleural plaques (1.45) was significantly (p<0.001) greater than that in the control group (0.68). Peribronchiolar fibrosis product was not significantly different for patients with and without a smoking history. Read the rest of this entry »

Pulmonary Disease Associated with Pleural “Asbestos” Plaques: Materials and Methods

All available pulmonary histologic findings were reviewed by three of us (R.F.S., R.H.H., and G.M.H.). A mean of eight slides was examined for each patient. Pulmonary sections were graded without knowledge of the patients group for peribronchiolar fibrosis, other types of fibrosis, emphysema, and pleural change. The degree of peribronchiolar fibrosis (Fig 2A) was scored from 0 to 12 based on the scheme for grading asbestosis established by the Pneumoconiosis Committee of the College of American Pathologists and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health in 1982. The score is the product of two grades, one for severity (scored 0 to 4) and the other for extent of involvement (scored 1 to 3). Read the rest of this entry »

Pulmonary Disease Associated with Pleural “Asbestos” Plaques

Pulmonary Disease Associated with Pleural “Asbestos” PlaquesThe term, asbestos, refers to a family of fibrous hydrous minerals that possess unique tensile strength and thermal and chemical stability. Due to the unique thermal stability of asbestos, products containing asbestos have been widely used in a variety of industries, particularly in shipbuilding. The association of exposure to asbestos with pulmonary fibrosis, termed asbestosis, is now well recognized and constitutes one of the major complications of the use of asbestos. Read the rest of this entry »

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