Archive for the ‘Fish consumption’ Category

Fish consumption by children in Canada: Review of evidence, challenges and future goals (part 12)

Review of evidence, challenges and future goals (part 12)

Other suggestions to improve parents’ and caregivers’ knowledge may include: improving dissemination of practical advice (electronically and in hard copy, ie, brochures, fact sheets); distribution of guidelines to various sites (eg, health clinics, retail stores, schools etc); engaging the public and health care providers in the design of advice; and continuous collaboration with the media to release balanced and practical advice.
Read the rest of this entry »

Fish consumption by children in Canada: Review of evidence, challenges and future goals (part 11)

4. Future prospects and recommendations
Many factors affect decisions on fish consumption including awareness of the health benefits and risks, access to guides, availability of fish and cost: “Consumer guidance should therefore be coordinated combining benefit and risk information and be easier to access and easier to understand”. Understanding decisionmaking in the context of fish consumption by children can help in the planning of educational programs that will improve the ability of parents and children to make smart fish-consumption decisions. It will also serve as a preliminary phase for future KT applications, where educational programs will be strictly designed and extensively promoted to address parents’ needs for information and practical advice.
Read the rest of this entry »

Fish consumption by children in Canada: Review of evidence, challenges and future goals (part 10)

Various information sources offer advice and guides for smart fish eating. However, these guides are not always easy to access, especially when information and updates are primarily electronically published or where hard copies, such as updated brochures and guidelines, are less abundant and more difficult to access. Other challenges beyond accessibility relate to the guides’ content, which can be difficult to comprehend and put into action, including multiple considerations for consumers (eg, sustainability considerations) and the identification of health outcomes and relating them to specific types of fish. Most advisories do not provide specific advice for growing and developing children of varying ages, which further delivers uneven messages for health risks and benefits. Additionally, media coverage and public reports, on both the health benefits and the health risks related to fish consumption, that have the bulk of the messaging focused on risks result in confusion, which can leave the consumer in doubt as to the credibility of all sources. These limitations in the available information may lead to indifference, and the disregarding of warnings or, conversely, to minimizing fish consumption altogether. This was demonstrated in a study in which pregnant women who reported improved awareness of fish advisories, also admitted to higher frequencies of fish avoidance. Another study found that consumers lacked accurate information on contaminants in fish to make informed risk-balancing decisions.
Read the rest of this entry »

Fish consumption by children in Canada: Review of evidence, challenges and future goals (part 9)

3. Fish advisories, awareness and consumption habits
Fish consumption has the potential to affect childhood neurodevelopment in both beneficial and detrimental ways; however, the majority of publications only address either the risks or the benefits. As a result, it is challenging to determine whether the benefits of fish consumtion outweigh the risks, although some researchers have attempted to do so.
Read the rest of this entry »

Fish consumption by children in Canada: Review of evidence, challenges and future goals (part 8)

Review of evidence, challenges and future goals (part 8)

Other contaminants associated with fish consumption are PCBs. PCBs are fat-soluble substances and, therefore, accumulate in fatty tissues. Exposure to PCBs through fish consumption, during fetal development and early life, has been shown to reduce the intelligence quotient and alter the behaviour of children. PCBs have also been associated with immune suppression and alteration of the thyroid gland and the reproductive systems of both men and women, and are also considered to be tumour promoters that enhance the effects of other carcinogenic substances. Furthermore, women exposed to PCBs are at high risk of giving birth to infants of low birth weight .
Read the rest of this entry »

Fish consumption by children in Canada: Review of evidence, challenges and future goals (part 7)

Three longitudinal studies in the Seychelles, New Zealand and Faroe Islands were used to define reference levels of MeHg for risk assessments and investigated the association between prenatal mercury levels and the neurodevelopment and neurobehaviour of children. The New Zealand and Faroe Islands studies found decrements in attention, language verbal memory, motor speed and visuospatial function. The Seychelles study did not replicate these associations. In an attempt to answer these inconsistencies, investigators suggested that adverse effects may become apparent in higher-order, cognitive functions that develop with maturity. However, additonal studies in the Seychelles followed mercury exposures in children up to 17 years of age and found no consistent pattern of adverse association between prenatal MeHg exposure and neurocognitive and behavioural outcomes. Read the rest of this entry »

Fish consumption by children in Canada: Review of evidence, challenges and future goals (part 6)

2. Health risks associated with fish consumption
The main health risks associated with eating fish, other than allergies, relate to the potential exposure to contaminants that can be found in fish and seafood. In this context, the most significant risks include exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) and persistent organic pollutants (eg, PCBs).
Read the rest of this entry »

About

So Many Advances in Medicine, So Many Yet to Come